Certified Warn Winch Repair and Warranty

Jason Omstead Mike Curtis

Jason Omstead
Mike Curtis

In February White Spruce Trailer Sales sent Jason Omstead and Mike Curtis to the Oregon Warn Plant to become certified in Warn Winch Repair and Warranty.  We are the only Certified Center in the Interior http://www.warn.com/corporate/authservicecenters.shtml

Jason and Mike have been trained to repair your Warn winches.  Many parts for your repairs are in stock at our North Pole store.

For your warranty issues, find your receipt of purchase, and give us a call or bring it into our location.  If you have a Warn product that is out of warranty, but you need parts, call or come in.  If we don’t have the part, we can have it here very shortly.  You can do your own fix or have Jason or Mike do the service work for you.

Warn is a great company to partner with.  They make a solid product and are continually involved in research and development.  We will be doing a blog shortly on the discontinued products and the new products hitting the shelves.  To take a look at ATV winches for the coming season here’s a place to start http://www.warn.com/atv/winches/line.shtml

Blog submitted by Leslie Gustafson, leslie@whitespruce.com

 

 

Required Annual Trailer Inspection – Yes or No?

annual-vehicle-inspection-label-vinyl-protective-laminate-2-ply-49-sn-500

Any trailer and its tow vehicle where the combined GVWR of the two equals or exceeds 10,000 pounds and are being used in commerce must have an annual safety inspection. Commerce involves any cash or barter whether or not the trailer owner has a business license, signs on the vehicle, or any other visual manifestation of commerce.

This means that someone with a single axle trailer with a GVWR of 3,000 pounds, (which is the rating of many small trailers), coupled with a newer half ton pickup, GVWR of 8,000 pounds, would be over 10,000 pounds combined GVWR and would need inspections.  If you, for instance, have a lawn care or remodeling business, and are pulling a trailer of the type usually used for this kind of job, you have a good chance of being stopped by a commercial vehicle enforcement officer and asked to see proof of an inspection on both the tow vehicle and trailer.

Annual inspection stickers that can be attached to the side or tongue of the trailer and on the right side of the tow vehicle on or near the door serve as a visual verification of these inspections. The stickers are not required, but a copy of the annual inspection report forms for the trailer and tow vehicle are required to be in the tow vehicle.

The trailer safety inspection focuses on the condition of the lights, axels, frame, tires hitch, brakes if the trailer has them, fenders, and overall condition regarding ability of the trailer to safely haul loads on the highway system.  Even a new trailer straight from the dealer, used in commerce,  is required to have the inspection the minute it hits the road.

Trailer inspections can be preformed by anyone meeting the standards according to http://fmcsa.dot.gov/rules-regulations/administration/fmcsr/fmcsrruletext.aspx?reg=396.19

White Spruce Trailer Sales can do the vehicle and trailer inspection and issue your Verification form/sticker for your trailer or your fleet of trailers.

Blog submitted by Jerry Gustafson, jerry@whitespruce.com   This article is copyright of White Spruce Trailers.  All rights reserved.

 

Do I need a Med Card to Pull a Trailer?

IMG_0576A med card is a card carried by a driver and provided by a physician, indicating that the driver is healthy enough to safely drive the vehicle on the Alaska highway system.  A med card is required for the driver if a tow vehicle and trailer combined have a GVWR that exceeds 10,000 pounds.  The requirement to have a med card applies to anyone involved in any commerce.  It doesn’t necessarily require a business license, or signs on the side of the truck, but if it is determined by a DOT enforcement officer that any money is exchanged or services bartered, the med card is required.

For example, someone with a single axle trailer with a GVWR of 3,000 pounds, (which is the rating of many small trailers), coupled with a newer half ton pickup, GVWR of 8,000 pounds, would be over 10,000 pounds combined GVWR and would need a med card.  If you, for instance, have a lawn care or remodeling business, and are pulling a trailer of the type usually used for this kind of job, you have a good chance of being stopped by a commercial vehicle enforcement officer and asked for your med card.

Most General Practice physicians will provide the required physical exam and fill out the med card.  The current cost for this service seems to be about $150.00.

Blog submitted by Jerry Gustafson, jerry@whitespruce.com  This article is copyright of White Spruce Trailers.  All rights reserved.

 

You Might Need a CDL if….

CDL NeededWhite Spruce Trailer Sales customers often ask us about state or federal DOT regulations regarding use of trailers. The information in this blog is our best understanding of these regulations after discussions with Alaska DOT personnel. Anyone buying a trailer needs to be aware that they may fall under some of these requirements even though they only own a small single axle trailer.

You may need a CDL if…

A commercial drivers license (CDL) is required if the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) as noted by the manufacturer’s sticker on the vehicle exceeds 26,000 pounds. This 26,000 pound weight requirement applies to either a single vehicle or a tow vehicle in combination with a trailer.

• If the tow vehicle alone is rated at over 26,000 pounds it requires the driver to have a CDL. If it is a straight truck (no trailer) this can either be a Class A or Class B CDL.
• If a truck as a tow vehicle has a GVWR of less than 26,000 pounds but is coupled with a trailer with a GVWR such that the combination of truck and trailer totals over 26,000 pounds, the driver must have a CDL.
• If the trailer GVWR exceeds 10,000 pounds and the combination is over 26,000 pounds, the driver must have a Class A CDL.
• If the trailer GVWR is less than 10,000 pounds and the combination is over 26,000 pounds, the driver can have a Class B CDL.
• The requirements for the CDL say nothing about commercial use vs. personal use of the equipment; so all operators of highway vehicles falling within these parameters need the CDL.
• The only exception is for large recreational RV’s where no CDL is required.

Some newer one-ton pickups such as a Ford F350 can have a GVWR of 14,000 pounds, which when coupled with a trailer with tandem (2) 7,000 pound axles would put the combination in the CDL requirement category. Also, all gooseneck trailers with tandem dual axles even if pulled by a ¾-ton pickup would fall into this category.

To find out if you are required to have a CDL, simply look at the manufacturer’s data tag on the inside of the truck door and on the trailer you are going to tow. Trailer manufacturers usually place their data tag on the tongue or on the front left side of the bed.

Blog submitted by Jerry Gustafson, jerry@whitespruce.com
This article is copyright of White Spruce Trailers. All rights reserved.